VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS ANNOUNCES THE 2010-2011 ARMED WITH A CAMERA FELLOWSHIP FOR EMERGING MEDIA ARTISTS

LOS ANGELES – Visual Communications (VC) is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applicants for its 2010-2011 Armed with a Camera Fellowship. The Armed with a Camera Fellowship is open to any applicants of Asian Pacific American descent who are under the age of 30 and have had previous work in a film festival, an exhibition screening or any program of the The Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival or VC exhibitions program. VC will award up to ten fellows a fellowship package including a cash grant of $500, access to equipment, editing facilities, training and workshops from industry professionals and mentorship, to complete a five-minute digital video within a five-month span of time.

Fellowship Eligibility and Selections Process

Selection for the Armed with a Camera Fellowship is based on the aforementioned eligibility criteria as well as a demonstrated commitment to the arts, production and exhibition experience, and the quality of the applicant’s sample work. Consideration will be given to communities that have been underserved and underrepresented in media arts.

Women, South Asian and Southeast Asian filmmakers are highly encouraged to apply to the Armed with a Camera Fellowship.

Final projects must be shot in digital video format and completed by March 30, 2011. A special program will showcase all completed projects at various VC exhibitions across the city of Los Angeles, including the 2011 Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival and other venues nationwide. VC will co-own the productions and will also package and distribute completed works. For more information about how to apply visit www.vconline.org.

Applications will be available starting July 2010. All applications must be submitted by 5PM on October 1, 2010.

Applicants will be contacted by the last week of October 2010.

Fellowship History and Mission

The Armed with a Camera Fellowship was established in 2001 and is one of the many ways in which VC seeks to support a new generation of Asian Pacific American media artists committed to preserving the legacy and vision of VC. Through the Armed with a Camera Fellowship, emerging artists are given the chance to capture their individual points of view about their world and surroundings as a part of a new generation of Asian Pacific Americans. In the nine years since its establishment, the Armed with a Camera Fellowship has provided access, equipment, and crucial training and mentoring to over 50 emerging artists and has yielded a sizeable portfolio of works that demonstrate a wide variety of visions and voices. “Visual Communications is proud to once again make the Armed with a Camera Fellowship available to our large community of emerging media artists,” said Shinae Yoon, Executive Director of Visual Communications. “The AWC Fellowship confirms our commitment to developing artists whose perspectives and voices will enrich the community at large, and at the same time assist in growing a strong, vibrate creative community.”

About Visual Communications

Founded in 1970, Visual Communications is the first Asian Pacific media arts center in the nation. The mission of Visual Communications is to promote intercultural understanding through the creation, presentation, preservation and support of media works by and about Asian Pacific Americans. Visual Communications was created with the understanding that media and the arts are important vehicles to organize and empower communities, build connections between generations, challenge perspectives, and create an environment for critical thinking, necessary to build a more just and humane society. Armed with a Camera Fellowship is partially funded by the James Irvine Foundation and the Los Angeles County Arts Commission.

MANAA Announces Winner of Student Scholarship Award for Academic Year 2010–2011

Bao Nguyen, Winner of Student Scholarship Award for Academic Year 2010–2011

Bao Nguyen, Winner of Student Scholarship Award for Academic Year 2010–2011

 

March 18, 2011 Los Angeles – MANAA is pleased to announce the selection of Mr. Bao Nguyen as its recipient of the Student Scholarship Award for Academic year 2010–2011. His documentary film, “A Tree Falls in the Forest

” was compelling and visually striking as it revealed the aftermath of 9/11 and its impact to the New York’s Chinatown community and business.

Mr. Nguyen is a student in the School of Visual Arts in New York. He was selected from a number of very talented candidates, but his work stood out. One of the scholarship committee members stated, “Bao’s piece shows great potential. His film on New York’s Chinatown post-9/11 proves that the community is lacking the attention it deserves.”

Another committee member stated, “The aesthetics, interview subjects, and production value of Bao’s film is exceptional. I can see him breaking into mainstream work.” One of his instructors, Deborah Dickson, stated in her nominating letter, “Bao’s work as a cinematographer stood out from the beginning. He brings care and vision to whatever he does… He will bring a special point of view and sensitivity to the story [of the Vietnamese fishing community after the BP oil spill] as a Vietnamese-American.” We look forward to Mr. Nguyen being an important voice in film in the years to come.

At a dinner meeting at Sam Woo’s BBQ in Chinatown, August 19, 2010: left to right: Rob Labuni, MANAA VP Lori Lopez, Emma Quan, and Jane Fu.

At a dinner meeting at Sam Woo’s BBQ in Chinatown, August 19, 2010: left to right: Rob Labuni, MANAA VP Lori Lopez, Emma Quan, and Jane Fu.

MANAA Announces Its 9th Annual Filmmaking Scholarship

LOS ANGELES- MANAA, the Media Action Network for Asian Americans, is pleased to announce one $1000 scholarship for currently enrolled graduate and undergraduate students interested in pursuing careers as filmmakers and in television production (not broadcast journalism). Formed in 1992, MANAA is the only organization solely dedicated to monitoring the media and advocating balanced, sensitive, and positive depiction and coverage of the Asian American community.

MANAA recognizes the urgent need to fill the ranks of television and film with persons of Asian descent in decision-making positions as screenwriters, directors, producers, and studio executives. We are looking to award students who have a strong desire to advance a positive and enlightened understanding of the Asian American experience in the mainstream media.Scholarship recipients will be selected on the basis of their academic and personal merit, desire to uplift the image of Asian Americans in film and television as demonstrated in their essay, and potential as demonstrated in their work sample.

The postmark deadline for submission is Friday, October 29, 2010.

STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

1. A copy of all official transcripts.

2. Two letters of recommendation, one that evaluates academic and artistic aptitude and another that speaks to the student’s interest and involvement in the community.

3. A double-spaced essay consisting of no more than 1,000 words addressing the following items: Describe your involvement in the Asian/Pacific Islander Community. How does this involvement influence your creative work? How do you see your creative work influencing the API community in the next five to ten years?

4. A work sample consisting of either a short film or a selection from a screenplay (your best scene plus a synopsis or a 1000-word excerpt). Materials will not be returned.

5. A resume of both your work history and your community involvement.

Send all completed applications to MANAA Scholarship, P.O. Box 11105, Burbank, CA 91510. Please do not send applications via certified or registered mail.

Jin Yoo-Kim Wins 2009 MANAA Scholarship

Jin Yoo-Kim and board member Lori Lopez meet at USC for congratulations on Yoo-Kim’s scholarship.

Jin Yoo-Kim and board member Lori Lopez meet at USC for congratulations on Yoo-Kim’s scholarship.

 

MANAA’s Student Scholarship Committee recently selected Jin Yoo-Kim to receive the 2009 scholarship of $1000. The committee was impressed with the professional quality of her numerous films, as well as the high praise given to her by her mentors.

“I was jumping for joy when I heard the news,” said Yoo-Kim. “The first thing I did was call my mom and dad because I wanted to tell them that I’m really an Asian American filmmaker and they don’t have to feel sad that I might not make it someday. I’m doing what I love.”

Yoo-Kim, an MFA student at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, has an impressive resume of films under her belt. Her work spans all genres and styles, from a documentary called Bearing Dreams on the prophetic dreams that Korean women have about the destiny of their unborn children, to Pretty, a fictional short about human trafficking and child prostitution, to Raider Nation, a humorous look at an obsessed football fan. She was also the recipient of an Armed with a Camera Fellowship at Visual Communication.

“My parents always wanted me to work in the family business,” she said. “But the turning point for my dad was when I had my picture in a Korean American newspaper promoting a film festival. He bought all the newspapers he could and gave it to all his family members. I saw how proud he was, and I knew he was going to let me do this now if I just push harder.”

One of Yoo-Kim’s goals with her work is to combat the stereotypical images of Asian Americans in films today. Although she is one of only three Asian Americans in her semester at USC, she strives to use all Asian American actors and crew. On her last set, all but 3 of the 20 or so crew members were Asian American. It’s a role that she thinks will land her the humorous award of “Most Asians in a Film” from her classmates, but she’s proud to take it on.

“The most Asian Americans I’ve seen in films is during my Asian American studies classes when they showed documentaries, and it just felt so natural,” she said. “I wanted to do that. I wanted to make Asian Americans look like part of society and not use them for any other reason.”

Working with Asian American actors is a pleasure for her because they are so excited to be working in an industry that often rejects them. She is also impressed with their creativity and thankful for their contributions to each project, which she feels are very collaborative in nature.

However, sometimes she struggles to convey her perspective in a world where Asian American experiences and identities are so misunderstood. On past films, her advisors have suggested that she add more ninja noises, gong sounds, or bonsai trees to her set dressing—Asian stereotypes that she refused to accept. Yoo-Kim also recalled a moment in class when the professor began talking about responsibility as a filmmaker.

“He said we should feel no responsibility about what we do because we’re creative and we shouldn’t hinder the artistic side. I totally disagreed with him,” she said. “I stood up and said I think as filmmakers we have an immense sense of responsibility because people watch film all over the world and it’s really powerful.”

Yoo-Kim’s latest film, called Cut the Fat, tells the story of a Korean girl who is bringing home her Korean boyfriend to meet her parents for the first time. She’s scared of her dad’s reaction, but she finds the strength to stand up to him. The film is based on some of her own experiences in seeking acceptance for her choices, and she’s excited because it’s not only what she considers her best work, but she is also planning on showing it to her dad at an upcoming screening.

“My parents are always worried about me. They tell me this industry isn’t right for me, that it’s not good for women. It’s a struggle,” she said.

Hopefully the MANAA Scholarship can help to validate her work and her struggles, and encourage her to continue bringing her unique perspective and talents to an industry that can definitely use them.

MANAA Announces Its Eighth Media Scholarship

LOS ANGELES- MANAA, the Media Action Network for Asian Americans, is pleased to announce one $1000 scholarship for currently enrolled graduate and undergraduate students interested in pursuing careers as filmmakers and in television production (not broadcast journalism). Formed in 1992, MANAA is the only organization solely dedicated to monitoring the media and advocating balanced, sensitive, and positive depiction and coverage of the Asian American community.

MANAA recognizes the urgent need to fill the ranks of television and film with persons of Asian descent in decision-making positions as screenwriters, directors, producers, and studio executives. We are looking to award students who have a strong desire to advance a positive and enlightened understanding of the Asian American experience in the mainstream media.

Scholarship recipients will be selected on the basis of their academic and personal merit, desire to uplift the image of Asian Americans in film and television as demonstrated in their essay, potential as demonstrated in their work sample, and financial need.

The deadline for submission is Friday, October 30, 2009.

STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

  1. A copy of all official transcripts.
  2. Two letters of recommendation, one that evaluates academic and artistic aptitude and another that speaks to the student’s interest and involvement in the community.
  3. A double-spaced essay consisting of no more than 1,000 words addressing the following items: Describe your involvement in the Asian/Pacific Islander Community. How does this involvement influence your creative work? How do you see how your creative work will influence the API community or how it is perceived in the next five to ten years?
  4. A work sample consisting of a short film or screenplay. Materials will not be returned.
  5. A statement of special financial need or hardship.
  6. A resume of both your work history and your community involvement.

Send all completed applications to MANAA Scholarship, P.O. Box 11105, Burbank, CA 91510. Please do not send applications via certified or registered mail.

For more information about MANAA and our monthly meetings, please visit the MANAA website at http://www.manaa.org. You can also visit our Facebook or MySpace account sites at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=14661828412 and http://www.myspace.com/manaala, or our blog at http://manaa.blogspot.com. Any questions regarding the scholarship should be directed to scholarship@manaa.org or (213) 486-4433.

MANAA Announces Its Seventh Media Scholarship

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: (909) 869-3899

MANAA Announces Its Seventh Media Scholarship

LOS ANGELES- MANAA, the Media Action Network for Asian Americans, is pleased to announce its $1000 scholarship for currently enrolled graduate and undergraduate students interested in pursuing careers as filmmakers and in television production (not broadcast journalism). Formed in 1992, MANAA is the only organization solely dedicated to monitoring the media and advocating balanced, sensitive, and positive depiction and coverage of the Asian American community.

MANAA recognizes the urgent need to fill the ranks of television and film with persons of Asian descent in decision-making positions as screenwriters, directors, producers, and studio executives. We are looking to award students who have a strong desire to advance a positive and enlightened understanding of the Asian American experience in the mainstream media.

Scholarship recipients will be selected on the basis of their academic and personal merit, desire to uplift the image of Asian Americans in film and television as demonstrated in their essay, potential as demonstrated in their work sample, and financial need.

The deadline for submission is Friday, October 30, 2009.

STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

1. A copy of all official transcripts.

2. Two letters of recommendation, one that evaluates academic and artistic aptitude and another that speaks to the student’s interest and involvement in the community.

3. A double-spaced essay consisting of no more than 1,000 words addressing the following items: Describe your involvement in the Asian/Pacific Islander Community. How does this involvement influence your creative work? How do you think your creative work will influence the API community in the next five to ten years?

4. A work sample consisting of a short film or screenplay. Materials will not be returned.

5. A statement of special financial need or hardship.

6. A resume of both your work history and your community involvement.

Send all completed applications to MANAA Scholarship, P.O. Box 11105, Burbank, CA 91510. Please do not send applications via certified or registered mail.

For more information about MANAA and our monthly meetings, please visit the MANAA website at http://www.manaa.org. You can also visit our Facebook or MySpace account sites at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=14661828412 andhttp://www.myspace.com/manaala, or our blog at http://manaa.blogspot.com. Any questions regarding the scholarship should be directed to scholarship@manaa.org or (213) 486-4433.

MANAA Announces Its Sixth Media Scholarship!

Scholarship 2008

MANAA Announces Its Sixth Media Scholarship

LOS ANGELES- MANAA, the Media Action Network for Asian Americans, is pleased to announce one $1000 scholarship for currently enrolled graduate and undergraduate students interested in pursuing careers as filmmakers and in television production (not broadcast journalism). Formed in 1992, MANAA is the only organization solely dedicated to monitoring the media and advocating balanced, sensitive, and positive depiction and coverage of the Asian American community.

MANAA recognizes the urgent need to fill the ranks of television and film with persons of Asian descent in decision-making positions as screenwriters, directors, producers, and studio executives. We are looking to award students who have a strong desire to advance a positive and enlightened understanding of the Asian American experience in the mainstream media.

Scholarship recipients will be selected on the basis of their academic and personal merit, desire to uplift the image of Asian Americans in film and television as demonstrated in their essay, potential as demonstrated in their work sample, and financial need.

The deadline for submission is Friday, May 9, 2008..

STUDENTS MUST SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

1. A copy of all official transcripts.

2. A copy of completed financial aid documents.

3. Two letters of recommendation, one that evaluates academic and artistic aptitude and another that speaks to the student’s interest and involvement in the community.

4. A double-spaced essay consisting of no more than 1,000 words answering the following questions: Where do you see yourself ten years from now? What accomplishments and strides will you hope to have made in your career in the film and television industry? How will you have worked to advance more positive images of Asian Americans in the mainstream media?

5. Optional. A work sample consisting of a short film or screenplay. Materials will not be returned.

Send all completed applications to MANAA Scholarship, P.O. Box 11105, Burbank, CA 91510. Please do not send applications via certified or registered mail.

For more information about MANAA and our monthly meetings, please visit our website at http://www.manaa.org orhttp://www.myspace.com/manaala. Any questions regarding the scholarship should be directed to scholarship@manaa.org or (213) 486-4433.

MANAA’s Interview with “On the Lot’s” Shalini Kantayya, MANAA’s 2004 Scholarship Winner

“On the Lot,” Fox’s reality show about 50 directors (chosen from 12,000 submissions), aired its finale on August 21, 2007 with Will Bigham named the winner of the $1 million development deal with Dreamworks Pictures. The series faced many problems, including an ever-dwindling audience that sunk to less than two million viewers (the finale got the attention of 2.5 million), the firing of Chelsea Handler as original host, and the hiring of greenhorn live host Adrianna Costa. The main interest of “On the Lot” to MANAA supporters, though, was the participation of Shalini Kantayya, a 30 year old director originally from Connecticut who’s lived in Brooklyn for the past 10 years.

The Indian American won MANAA’s 2004 scholarship and demonstrated her commitment to the cause week after week, finishing in the Top 10. Guy Aoki, a MANAA Board Member and the group’s founding president, interviewed Ms. Kantayya by phone. The following interview previously ran in an abridged version of Aoki’s “Into the Next Stage” column in the Rafu Shimpo newspaper.

Guy Aoki: Well, first of all, we’re so proud of what you’ve done.

Shalini Kantayya: Oh thank you!

GA: I mean, what’s really terrific is that you used at least one Asian person in every one of your films (SK laughs). And you know, that’s so refreshing because I often hear Asian American writers say, “Well, I’m gonna have to wait ’till I make it [to help Asian Americans].” They get onto the writing staff of a TV show, and they’re still very self-conscious about being Asian American. I understand that: If there’s like only one Asian in the whole writing room and everyone else is white, then they don’t want to be an advocate right off the bat. They want to just kind of fit in and show that they’re like a team player.

SK: Very understandable.

GA: And then you wait and wait and wait and you wonder, “Well, are they going to remember when they make it, or are they just going to get so used to doing white stories and casting white people that they’re gonna forget about it by the time they, quote, ‘make it?'” So I was so happy that every one of your films featured an Asian person, and it didn’t take away from the piece, and it was part of the success! Was it [intentional?]

SK: Well, we had a pool of actors to work from so you’re pretty restricted. Do I have a commitment to diversify? Absolutely. But I think more than that… I never want to be held back or boxed in as an Asian American filmmaker. I hope that if I’m asked to make a film about Latino gangs, I’ll be able to do it, or white American suburban life that I’ll be able to do it. But I think as my voice grows as a filmmaker, we make films about things that we know about. And I happen to know, for instance, the script for “Doctor-In-Law” was great. That script could’ve been about any immigrant community. It could’ve been Czechoslovakian people, could’ve been any first generation family, but I think those kinds of immigrant stories are very close to my heart and Doctor-In Law, I think, was a script asking for me to direct it.

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General Meeting – July 19, 2007

Thursday, July 19th. Monthly general meeting start at 7:30 PM at the Chinatown Public Safety Association in Chinatown. Located at 823 N. Hill Street between Alpine and College Streets. We welcome your input and thoughts on pressing issues regarding the portrayal of Asian Americans in print, radio, television and movies. Among the issues we will be discussing are:

-Communications with Jay Leno about guest Chelsea Handler’s offensive comments on Angelina Jolie’s adopted Vietnamese son. (See a copy of our press release at www.myspace.com/manaala)

-One of MANAA’s scholarship winners being a contestant on Fox’s “On the Lot” and using Asian American actors in every one of her film shorts!

 

MANAA announces 2004 Scholarship Winner – Shalini Kantayya

 

shalini kantayya

Shalini Kantayya, filmmaker, educator, and activist uses film/video as a tool to educate, inspire, and empower audiences. Shalini recently received the 2001 William D. Fulbright Fellowship to make a documentary film about political street theatre in India. Her recent documentary, MANTHAN ( THE CHURNING ) received the first prize award for best documentary at the Asian American Film Institute Festival (New York). Her films have been screened at international film festivals including the Toronto Inside Out Film Festival, The Ivy Film Festival, The MIX Festival, Vancouver Film Festival, The New Festival, Images and Voices of Hope, Paisley Gallery New York, and Chemould Art Gallery Bombay. Shalini has lectured at schools and universities such as The Convergence Institute of Media, The Symbiosis Institute of Mass Communications, and the San Francisco Waldorf School. She holds a BA in International Relations and Multi-Media Production at Hampshire College and is currently pursuing an MFA in Media Art production at the City College of New York. Shalini is currently working on A DROP OF LIFE, is a speculative fiction film based on a global water crisis, and CONNECTED, a documentary about how the call center industry is effecting the lives of urban Indian women.